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Artigo 2


Itaparica
Archaeological
Site Project

Itaparica, Bahia, Brazil
2003, January/February



Site Project
  Artigo 1
  Artigo 2
  Arqueologia no Brasil
  Metodologia do trabalho arqueológico
  Carbono 14
  Metodologia adotada para o projeto
  Niéde Guidon
  Galeria de imagens
 
 Encontradas mais 6 peças na praia de Itaparica, Bahia, Brasil.
         
 

Reuters - February 11, 2003

Itaparica, BA, Brazil - Two weeks following the unprecedented discovery of an ancient tablet on Itaparica island, in northeastern Brazil, six more antiquities which appear to originate in the same culture have been unearthed. Small flat tablets or disks engraved with markings remarkably like electronic circuitry or binary codes, neither their makers nor their era of origin have as yet been identified. A team of specialized praiarcheologists, headed by the distinguished and controversial Vincent Agustinovich, Professor Emeritus of Iberoisliatic Antiquities at the University of New York in New Jersey, disenterred the weathered but apparently largely intact artifacts with surprising speed. "As I said before", attested Professor Agustinovitch, "this is definitely the most important, groundbreaking archeological find ever. I mean, ever." Professor Agustinovitch’s Emeritus status was recently called in to question by serious allegations that he had forged two tiny pieces, a thimble

 

and an awl, in an otherwise legitimate collection of Paleolithic Azorean tomb objects whose excavation he oversaw in 1944. "I can’t tell you how surprised I would be if these pieces turn out to be anything special," said Professor Kitschell Hornius, of the University of Finisterre in Cacha Pregos. "I don’t know what they are or what they were doing out there in the beach, but it seems to me Agustinovitch specializes in creating diversions." Professor Agustinovitch has long also been rumoured to be employed by the CIA, but has consistently countered such rumours with allegations that the CIA is persecuting him. "Professional jealousy goes with the territory, so to speak" commented Taylor Van Loch Ness, chief curator of Her Majesty’s Museum of Old Pretty Things in Cairo, whose collection houses most of the most significant archeological finds of the last hundred and fifty years. "I’d say Vince has an even chance of coming out of this with his hands clean. So to speak." The pieces are currently being carbon dated. P.V.

 
         
 
 
Peça #1
 
Peça #1 em exposição
 
Detalhe da Peça #1
 
Detalhe da Peça #1
 
Peça #2
 
Peça #3
 
Peça #4
 
Peça #5
 
Peça #6
 
Peça #7